9/11 Reverse-Christian Priorities: ‘FORGET’ the Million+ We Killed, ‘REMEMBER’ Our 3,000 Killed

“It’s normal for the kingdom of the world to consider the boys in body-bags on our side more important than the boys in body-bags on their side. But from a kingdom of God perspective, we would consider all body-bags to be equally tragic.

The kingdom of the world is always involved in conflict, because it’s a power-over kingdom, and if you’re getting in the way of my power-over we’ll have to go to war over this. And usually in the kingdom of the world you demonize your enemies to rally up power against them.

But in the kingdom of God, we are not allowed to have any enemies. We’re forbidden to have enemies of flesh and blood. The ones who think that they are our enemies, we are commanded to love them, to serve them, to lay down our life for them.

While the kingdom of the world is about conflict, the kingdom of God is about reconciliation.”

– Gregory Boyd
Pastor of Woodland Hills church in Minneapolis

“Never forget” = Never forgive

Related:

(Video) Greg Boyd on ‘Charlie Rose’: How the Quest for Political Power Is Destroying the Church

 

Christian Peacemakers Picket Southern Baptist Convention To ‘Choose Life Not War’

We Hold These Truths greeted messengers to the 2017 annual meeting of the Southern Baptist Convention (SBC), held in Phoenix, Arizona. The vigilers were armed only with signs like “Choose Life, Not War,” “Blessed Are The Peacemakers,” “Where Are The Peacemakers?” and “No More Wars For Israel,” and two fliers: “Choose Life Not War” and “Does The Bible Require Followers of Jesus to Support the Jewish State of Israel? After over 200 vigils around the country, in terms of people engaged and fliers distributed, this vigil turned out to be one of our most effective ones, since we started them in Nov. 2002 at the First Southern Baptist Church of Scottsdale [AZ].

STORY

Related:

(video) “Zionism and Christianity: Unholy Alliance” – real-history, full-length film by Ted Pike — “They [pastors] were supposed to be WATCHMEN on the wall, yet they failed to utter even a hint of warning”

(video) Roots of Christian Zionism: How Scofield Sowed Seeds of Apostasy — The ‘Angry’ Evangelicals – Praying for War instead of obeying Christ: “Blessed are the Peacemakers, for they shall be called the children of God” • God’s words to Abraham, “I will bless them that bless thee…” (Gen. 12:3) does NOT refer to the modern state of Israel

Pat Buchanan: Are America’s Wars Just and Moral? — HORRENDOUS CARNAGE in Syria: at least 475,000 dead, 5 million Syrian refugees driven into exile • 11 million Syrians driven from their homes into wretched living conditions and near famine • Two of Syria’s greatest and oldest cities pounded into ruins • Wars in Syria, Libya and Yemen never authorized by Congress • And WE WONDER WHY THEY HATE US • Meanwhile, as the Americans bomb across the Middle East, China rises!

Get ready. America will be judged, especially since ‘Christians’ are among the biggest warmongers, reverse-peacemakers — responsible…!

– –

Are America’s Wars Just and Moral?

“One knowledgeable official estimates that the CIA-backed fighters may have killed or wounded 100,000 Syrian soldiers and their allies,” writes columnist David Ignatius.

Given that Syria’s prewar population was not 10 percent of ours, this is the equivalent of a million dead and wounded Americans. What justifies America’s participation in this slaughter?

Columnist Eric Margolis summarizes the successes of the six-year civil war to overthrow President Bashar Assad.

“The result of the western-engendered carnage in Syria was horrendous: at least 475,000 dead, 5 million Syrian refugees driven into exile in neighboring states (Turkey alone hosts three million), and another 6 million internally displaced. … 11 million Syrians … driven from their homes into wretched living conditions and near famine. …

”Two of Syria’s greatest and oldest cities, Damascus and Aleppo, have been pounded into ruins. Jihadist massacres and Russian and American air strikes have ravaged once beautiful, relatively prosperous Syria. Its ancient Christian peoples are fleeing for their lives before US and Saudi takfiri religious fanatics.” …

Among the principles for a just war, it must be waged as a last resort, to address a wrong suffered, and by a legitimate authority. Deaths of civilians are justified only if they are unavoidable victims of a deliberate attack on a military target.

The wars in Syria, Libya and Yemen were never authorized by Congress. The civilian dead, wounded and uprooted in Syria, and the malnourished millions in Yemen, represent a moral cost that seems far beyond any proportional moral gain from those conflicts.

In which of the countries we have attacked or invaded in this century — Afghanistan, Iraq, Syria, Libya, Yemen — are the people better off than they were before we came?

And we wonder why they hate us.

“Those to whom evil is done/Do evil in return,” wrote W. H. Auden in “September 1, 1939.” As the peoples of Syria and the other broken and bleeding countries of the Middle East flee to Europe and America, will not some come with revenge on their minds and hatred in their hearts?

Patrick BuchananMeanwhile, as the Americans bomb across the Middle East, China rises.

Entire Article

Calvinism Destroying Christianity Justifying US Others > *PROOF*: JOHN CALVIN had Servetus MURDERED, REJECTING Jesus’ Teaching of ENEMY LOVE — Calvinism is a theological system designed by someone who had no moral or theological objections to killing those who disagreed with him

No wonder that so many Calvinists are ‘Christian’ Zionists, promoting murder in Jesus’ name.

John Calvin was a reverse-Christian who lived and taught a perverted version of Christianity.

– –

The Execution of Michael Servetus & My Primary Deal-Breaker with Calvinism

by Benjamin L. Corey

Burning Wizards 16th

…many modern Calvinists have never actually read what John Calvin taught. Calvinist writer and pastor Tim Callies completely agrees:

Many, and no doubt most Calvinists have never read a word of John Calvin. Instead they reluctantly call themselves Calvinists because they feel John Calvin was gifted by God to understand and interpret the Scriptures and that he restored to the church doctrine that had been lost for hundreds of years.”

Perhaps one of the chief issues in modern Calvinism is that many don’t understand what their founder taught, or how he lived. …

When reading Calvin there’s no shortage of problematic stuff one will find, as Zack Hunt articulately wrote about recently. From teaching that God not only picks who will go to heaven but also picks who will go to hell (before they’re even born!) and that God is the agent who ordains every act of evil in the world….

My primary point of departure from Calvinism is looking at how Calvin lived, and being able to see that he didn’t grasp (or was just completely unwilling to obey) one of the most basic things Jesus taught: enemy love. And this brings us to the execution of Michael Servetus– my primary “do not pass go” moment with Calvin.

Michael Servetus (1511-1553) was a theological enemy of Calvin and the two had mutual disdain for the other (Servetus thought Calvin was obnoxious and in return, Calvin felt Servetus was pompous). Servetus rejected orthodox Christianity (issues such as the trinity), holding what would correctly be called heretical views. In those days heretics were executed, and at one point Servetus was arrested- but released for lack of evidence. Soon after, he was re-arrested by the Catholic church and convicted of a capital offense– thanks to John Calvin, who sent some of Servetus heretical writings to the authorities. However, Servetus escaped from prison and was free to write again.

Calvin had previously vowed that if it were at all possible, he’d have Servetus killed, but his escape from prison thwarted those hopes. It wouldn’t be long however before Calvin could fulfill the vow he made against Servetus in 1546:

“Servetus wrote to me a short time ago, and sent a huge volume of his dreamings and pompous triflings with his letter. I was to find among them wonderful things, and such as I had never before seen; and if I wished, he would himself come. But I am by no means inclined to be responsible for him; and if he come, I will never allow him, supposing my influence worth anything, to depart alive.” [1]

As much as I dislike Calvin, Servetus was either an idiot or had a death wish, because instead of fleeing to safety he showed up at church one night in Geneva to hear Calvin preach (he’s certainly guilty of antagonizing Calvin). Calvin of course, didn’t miss the opportunity and had his friend Nicholas de la Fontaine arrest Servetus on 40 capital charges of heresy. During the trial, Calvin wrote that he hoped the verdict would come back as death[2], and it did. Servetus was ultimately burned at the stake– atop a pyre of his own books and green wood to draw out his death– which reportedly took 30 minutes.

And thus, John Calvin was responsible for having his enemy killed.

Now, both sides tend to overplay their hand on the death of Servetus. Those who stand against Calvin will often call it murder, and those strongly in the Calvin camp will try to explain it away as just the “culture of the time.” (Aren’t we supposed to stand against evil in culture?) Certainly this was not murder in the sense that Calvin walked up and personally killed Servetus– but he did collaborate with the local government to have him killed on two occasions. Also, it is true that Calvin tried to get Servetus to repent of his theology and when that didn’t work, he sought to have him beheaded instead of burned alive. However, I find the Calvinist tendency to play the “he tried to have him beheaded as an act of mercy” card a bit disingenuous, as if beheading an enemy is somehow morally superior to burning one.

In addition, Calvin wasn’t simply an innocent bystander in a violent culture– he was actually one of the folks promoting it. Calvin once wrote that those who objected to killing heretics were just as guilty as the heretics themselves:

“Whoever shall maintain that wrong is done to heretics and blasphemers in punishing them makes himself an accomplice in their crime and guilty as they are…” [3]

So, not only does he argue killing theological enemies to be good, but Calvin argued that one was not even morally free to oppose it. Furthermore, Calvin argued that the blood of no one– not even a person’s own family should be spared:

“… we spare not kin, nor blood of any, and forget all humanity when the matter is to combat for His glory.” [4]

Got that? We must not spare our own families of bloodshed– in fact, we must “forget all humanity” when doing combat for God’s glory.

(And don’t even get me going on the fact that Calvin was somewhat famous for his abusive speech toward others— aka, the sin of reviling as condemned by Paul.)

Calvinism is, by definition, the teachings of John Calvin– a man whose actions show me either (a) he didn’t understand Jesus or (b) he didn’t want to obey Jesus. Why in the world would I want to build the totality of my Christian theology on a foundation erected by such a person?  If Calvin didn’t understand something so basic as torturing and killing people is something a Jesus follower probably shouldn’t do, I have zero confidence that he ever understood the more complex theological issues.

And this is my primary deal breaker: before any discussion on sovereignty, evil, or predestination, I am unable to move past the fact that Calvinism is a theological system designed by someone who had no moral or theological objections to brutally killing those who disagreed with him.

[1] Henry, Paul. The Life and Times of John Calvin, Vol II. Whittaker & Co, London. Pg. 181

[2] Calvin to William Farel, August 20, 1553, Bonnet, Jules (1820–1892) Letters of John Calvin, Carlisle, Penn: Banner of Truth Trust, 1980, pp. 158–159. ISBN 0-85151-323-9.

[3] Marshall, John (2006). John Locke, Toleration and Early Enlightenment Culture. Cambridge Studies in Early Modern British History. New York: Cambridge University Press. p. 325. ISBN 0-521-65114-X.

[4] ibid

Entire Article

Related:

John Calvin – Thug for Christ: “I would like to kill again the man that I have destroyed” – Founder of once-saved-always-saved (OSAS)

My Ph.D.-genius-friend, John Calvin scholar: “In all my reading of Calvin, I don’t recall him ever apologizing for a mistake or admitting an error.” | According to Paul, can John Calvin be in heaven?

John Calvin Didn’t Follow Christ: “If you can burn people at the stake, and drown people in the river, and drive them out of town into a Swiss winter, and say you got that from the Bible, you’re not an exegete. And that’s the kind of man John Calvin was” – Mike Floyd

John Calvin Had Servetus Burned at the Stake — His Ashes Cry Out!

John Calvin was a Persecutor

The Protestant Reformers Were Frauds: By their Fruits You Will Know Them…

Felix Manz (1498-1527) – Drowned by Zwingli for Rebaptizing — Manz wanted to bring together those who were willing to accept Christ, OBEY the Word, and FOLLOW in Jesus’ footsteps, to UNITE with these by baptism

Greg Boyd: In the kingdom of God, we are not allowed to have any enemies

Salvation: CALVINISM VS ARMINIANISM COMPARISON CHART – 5 Points of Calvinism (T.U.L.I.P.) & 5 Points of Arminianism

Who-Goes-To-Heaven Scriptures — Narrow is the Way | Who are the Children of God? — “There is therefore now *no condemnation* to those who are IN CHRIST Jesus, who don’t WALK according to the flesh, but ACCORDING TO THE SPIRIT.” (Where Paul is reconciled with James — and with Hebrews and 1 John — and with Jesus. It all fits!)

Charles Spurgeon on ‘CHRISTIAN’ WAR FEVER — War is an enormous crime, murder on a large scale • The great crime of war can never promote the religion of peace • Christianity must be sustained by love • The *spirit* of war is the extreme opposite… • Our kingdom is not of this world • Our weapons are spiritual, pulling down strongholds • The true Christian does to others as he would they should do to him • Bloodshed on the smallest or largest scale is sinful • “Love your enemies, do good to them that hate you” • We fight not with men but with “spiritual wickedness in high places” • We are fighting *for* men rather than against them • A war against falsehood, against sin is God’s war • Woe to the Christian who forgets this • Times of feverish excitement test our attachment to great principle • The fight-spirit must be battled with & the genius of gentleness must be cultivated • When undertaken from a dire necessity, as the last resource… • Ought not to be smiled upon as a brilliant spectacle, nor talked of with a light heart • Peace teaching is practical gospel teaching • “Thou shalt love thy neighbour as thyself” must resound from our pulpits and be practised…

What a breath of fresh air!!!!!!! This was pure joy to dig deeply within!!!

– –

Reformatted from LewRockwell.com. Emphasis also mine:

Charles Spurgeon on Christian War Fever

By 

March 17, 2005

We know all too well about Christian war fever — that sickening blind worship of the state that elevates George W. Bush to Messiah status and seeks to justify his immoral, unscriptural, unconstitutional war in Iraq by incessantly repeating the mantras “obey the powers that be” and “God is a God of war.” But who is Charles Spurgeon and why should we care what he said about war?

Charles Haddon Spurgeon (1834—1892) was an English Baptist minister who served as pastor of the Metropolitan Tabernacle in London from 1861 until his death. But Spurgeon was no ordinary minister. He was a pastor, a preacher, a teacher, an author, an editor, and the overseer of a pastor’s college, a Christian literature society, and an orphanage. He is still widely revered today among Baptists (and others as well) as one of the greatest Baptist ministers in history.

Spurgeon preached his first sermon as a teenager and, in 1854, was called to the pastorate of the historic New Park Street Church, Southwark, London. During his thirty-eight-year tenure, the church increased from 232 to over 5,000. During the remodeling of the Park Street chapel to house the growing congregation, Spurgeon preached at the 5,000-seat Exeter Hall, a public auditorium. But because the remodeled chapel was still too small to accommodate the crowds, the church began construction of the Metropolitan Tabernacle, which sat 5,500 and had standing room for 500 more. In the interim, Spurgeon preached to thousands at the Surrey Gardens Music Hall. He was truly one of the most popular preachers in history. When he died in 1892, 60,000 people filed past his casket in the Tabernacle.

Spurgeon lives today through his sermons. From 1855 until his death, his Sunday morning sermons were published weekly. By 1865, Spurgeon’s sermons were selling 25,000 copies every week. They would eventually be translated into more than twenty languages. The sermons were then collected in one volume and reissued at the end of each year in book form. After Spurgeon’s death, the series continued until 1917 using his Sunday evening sermons. The six volumes of the New Park Street Pulpit (1855—1860) and the fifty-seven volumes of the Metropolitan Tabernacle Pulpit (1861—1917) contain 3,561 sermons, 25 million words, and fill 41,500 pages. Many of these volumes are available online, and most are in print.

Unlike some Baptist preachers today who shamelessly serve as spokesmen or apologists for Bush and his “splendid little war” in Iraq, Spurgeon was not the least bit excited about war and war fever.

Spurgeon on War

Spurgeon’s comments on war can be found in his sermons on a variety of topics. He rarely preached a sermon that was specifically about war. His observations about war are overwhelmingly negative:

Long have I held that war is an enormous crime; long have I regarded all battles as but murder on a large scale (“India’s Ills and England’s Sorrows,” September 6, 1857, Music Hall, Royal Surrey Gardens).

Continue reading “Charles Spurgeon on ‘CHRISTIAN’ WAR FEVER — War is an enormous crime, murder on a large scale • The great crime of war can never promote the religion of peace • Christianity must be sustained by love • The *spirit* of war is the extreme opposite… • Our kingdom is not of this world • Our weapons are spiritual, pulling down strongholds • The true Christian does to others as he would they should do to him • Bloodshed on the smallest or largest scale is sinful • “Love your enemies, do good to them that hate you” • We fight not with men but with “spiritual wickedness in high places” • We are fighting *for* men rather than against them • A war against falsehood, against sin is God’s war • Woe to the Christian who forgets this • Times of feverish excitement test our attachment to great principle • The fight-spirit must be battled with & the genius of gentleness must be cultivated • When undertaken from a dire necessity, as the last resource… • Ought not to be smiled upon as a brilliant spectacle, nor talked of with a light heart • Peace teaching is practical gospel teaching • “Thou shalt love thy neighbour as thyself” must resound from our pulpits and be practised…”